Monday, May 25, 2020

Future of Nursing Essay - 760 Words

1 The Future of Nursing Cathleen Atkins Grand Canyon University September 16th, 2012 The Future 2 The future of healthcare is dependent upon the role nurses play in the care of the patient. A committee was formed between the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Institute of Medicine to address the needs of reformation of nursing. The purpose of the study was multifold. The study looked at ways to reform our healthcare system to meet the challenges of safe, quality patient care while maintaining affordability and accessibility with the help of a transformed nursing profession. The transformation of the nursing profession focuses on three main areas. The areas include education, nurse practice setting, and the nurses’ role†¦show more content†¦Nurses with their BSN The Future 3 degree is usually favored over the ADN degree nurse to be hired in an acute setting. Although there is a shortage of nursing faculty the ADN degree student has a variety of options open to them to obtain their BSN degree. Many colleges and universities offer an online pr ogram to achieve higher education. The nurse practice setting is an ever evolving entity. Legislation is underway to shift healthcare toward prevention and wellness, primary care and transitional care settings. The shift will deviate from the areas of acute and specialty care. Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners play an important role in the primary care setting. Most ARNP’s are limited in their scope of practice by the state in which they live, although they received the education to provide advanced care. Sometimes the ARNP’s extensive and specialized training cannot be put to use because of policy regulations or barriers. Some barriers have resulted because of a limited work force while other barriers are due to a flawed healthcare system. An Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner’s education has taught them how to work with different entities to successfully take care of a chronically ill patient. ARNPs’ can work with a team of physical therapists, nutritionists or social wo rkers to help manage the overall health of the patient. If the patient’s condition is more complex than what the ARNP can take care of then theShow MoreRelatedThe Future of Nursing966 Words   |  4 PagesThe Future of Nursing In 2010 the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJK), a subsidiary of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), issued a report on nursing called, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, (http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2010/The-Future-of-Nursig-Leadership-Change-Advancing-Health.aspx). According to the IOM official website, (http://www.iom.edu/), â€Å"†¦the IOM provides independent, objective, evidence-based advice to policy makers, health professional, the private sectorRead MoreThe Future of Nursing999 Words   |  4 PagesFUTURE OF NURSING * SUTHA FERNANDO – DATE: 12-23-2012 GRAND CANYAN UNIVERSITY ABSTRACT The Institute of Medicine has thoroughly analyzed the Future of Nursing and submitted report. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) is a nonprofit organization that works independently, provides unbiased and authoritative advice to general public as well as government. In this essay we would discuss about the significance of report and recommendations of IOM. In 2010 the IOM has advised the GovernmentRead MoreThe Future of Nursing940 Words   |  4 Pagesï » ¿ The Future of Nursing Grand Canyon University Professional Dynamics NRS-430V The Future of Nursing Looking back over 150 years ago, the nursing profession has changed drastically. Even just the uniform of nurses changed from the white dresses with panty hose and a white cap to scrubs with pants. Here are a few other examples of change in the profession: â€Å"there was a time in the past when only physicians took blood pressures, performed phlebotomy and administered blood; andRead MoreThe Future of Nursing1402 Words   |  6 Pagesï » ¿Future of Nursing Introduction ONE: Discuss the work of the Committee of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)†¦that led to the IOM report, Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health†¦ The committee was led by former Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala, and was asked to create basically a blueprint for how the nursing profession can transform itself into a more potent and relevant force, Harvey V. Fineberg wrote (on page ix). The nursing committee wasRead MoreFuture of Nursing1315 Words   |  6 PagesThe Future of Nursing July 14, 2013 The Future of Nursing According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the nursing profession is the largest population in the nation s health care workforce with over three million members. Because of this, nurses have a fundamental role in the transformation of the nation s rapidly changing health care environment. To achieve this role, the IOM addressed several key recommendations to serve as a guide to the direction of the future of nursing (InstituteRead MoreThe Future of Nursing1170 Words   |  5 PagesThe Future of Nursing Carrie Curell Grand Canyon University: NRS-430-0191 Professional Dynamics 02/23/2013 The Future of Nursing The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has researched how nursing as we know it will and is changing. They have written a report called â€Å"The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health† that outlines the impact of these changes on education, nursing practice, and nurses as leaders and made recommendations on the necessary changes. Regarding the impact of educationRead MoreFuture of Nursing1378 Words   |  6 Pages2010 IOM report on the future of nursing 1. Running Head: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF NURSING PROFESSIONALS Professional development of nursing professionals: 2010 IOM report on the future of nursing Awudu BraimahRead MoreFuture of Nursing1041 Words   |  5 PagesThe Vision for Nursing is a Bright Nur/391 Sharon Berry Facilitator Arlene Leyba December 1, 2014 United ICN, the nurses of all nations speak with one voice. We speak as advocates for all those we serve, and for all the unserved, insisting that prevention, care and cure be the right of every human being. We are in the vanguard of health care progress, shaping health policy around the world through our expertise, the strength of our numbers, the alignment of our efforts, and ourRead MoreThe Future of Nursing834 Words   |  4 Pagesï » ¿Running head: The Future Nursing The Future Nursing The Future of Nursing The Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) will have a great effect on nursing. According to this article nursing will have to change it role in the ACA and the three main categories that need to be changed and redeveloped is transforming practice, education and leadership. â€Å"The ACA outlines some new health care arrangements, and with these structures will come new opportunities for new rolesRead MoreThe Future of Nursing1181 Words   |  5 PagesThe Future of Nursing Grand Canyon University NRS-440V 3.24.13 Introduction This paper will discuss various aspect of the future of health care focusing on the future of how nursing will play an ever-important role in the reformation of health care. Presentation regarding, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the future of nursing, at the Institute of Medicine report entitled, â€Å"Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health,† will help set the stage for this paper. Discussion

Friday, May 15, 2020

The Impact of the Nursing Shortage on Patient Care Free Essay Example, 1000 words

The primary concern will be the impact it has on the ability of nurses to provide quality health care. With fewer staff, nurses are required to work longer hours and assume additional responsibilities. Overworked nurses, burdened with fatigue and job stress, are more prone to accidental errors and a reduction in timely medical attention. A survey of registered nurses indicated that 79 percent of hospital-employed RNs believed that short staffing contributed to a reduction in the quality of patient care (Buerhaus et al, 2005). A long-term and escalating nursing shortage could contribute to the 98,000 deaths per year due to medical errors as reported by the Institute of Medicine in 2000 (Buerhaus et al, 2005). Aside from the important issue of the quality of patient care is the factor of rising health care costs. As the labor supply of qualified nurses shrinks, the competition for nurses increases. A wage war may result from the shortage and will contribute to the rising costs as hosp itals increase the wages and compensatory packages for their staff. Costs associated with temporary hiring practices have also increased due to the shortage. We will write a custom essay sample on The Impact of the Nursing Shortage on Patient Care or any topic specifically for you Only $17.96 $11.86/pageorder now While an increase in wages may seem to benefit the nurses, increased demands may not be worth the cost. Nurses working extended shifts and longer hours may come under increased scrutiny from administrators and government regulators struggling to eliminate the human errors and the increased cost of malpractice insurance. According to Rivers, "An increase in errors related to fatigue significantly increases the cost of malpractice insurance". The continuing nursing shortage will have its greatest effects on future nurses that will be entering the field or are currently enrolled in a nursing program. Nursing, a field that will have the greatest number of job openings in the next decade, may find it is short of qualified instructors in the future. As wages increase, instructors may be tempted to leave teaching positions and take a position as a practicing nurse to reap the economic benefits.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Australia Is A Country With Cultural And Ethnic Diversity...

Australia is a country with cultural and ethnic diversity. People in this country have right to express and share their individual culture, religious belief and values. In this diverse environment, there are several of reasons why nurses can refuse to participate in procedures, which are against as well as unacceptable in their own religious, moral, ethical beliefs and value as a health care professional. However, there should be a fine line between those religious, moral belief and the individual’s personal convenience and preference. This essay will discuss on the right of nurses to refuse to participate in procedure, which are not acceptable in terms of their religious, moral and ethical value. It also states what are the reasonable steps to be taken and the situation that should be and exemption due to patient welfare. Furthermore explain why the fear, personal convenience or preference should not be the reason for the nurses to restrain from their duty and care. As stated in the first sentence of the introduction, Australia is a multicultural country. Nurses as well as patients are from different ethnic background and hold their own individual values. Common wealth government has identified cultural identity as one of the three dimension of multicultural policy which states that all Australians has right to express and share their own culture heritage, beliefs and values (What is multiculturalism?, 2014). They should not be forced to exercise something that isShow MoreRelatedThe Impact Of Ethnic Diversity On The Development Of An Entrepreneur1617 Words   |  7 PagesActivity (TEA) in countries like Australia, Canada and United States, whereas there is low TEA in Norway and United Kingdom . Generally, entrepreneurship can be defined as â€Å"a purposeful activity to initiate, maintain and develop a profit-orientated business† . However, for one to succeed as an entrepreneur, they must go beyond the ‘norm’ and different iate themselves from other competing entrepreneurs; this may be achieved by embracing both social and ethnic diversity. Social diversity refers to the differentRead MoreMulticulturalism And Its Impact On Society1585 Words   |  7 PagesAccording to Takaki and Rattansi, Multiculturalism was a concept that played a vital role in how cultures assembled together in celebration of cultural diversity and pluralism to redress the inequalities all throughout the world. Through the readings, it is easy to identify that multiculturalism made a daily impact on people. The most critical social groups such as race, gender, religion, sexuality, nationality, and disability face the most constraint and enmity on social identity and opportunityRead MoreThe Tourism Industry : An Source Of Revenue For Many Countries1226 Words   |  5 Pagesindustry has become an increasingly important source of revenue for many countries. In the global environment concept, the tourism is the main communicator and promotor of the international trade. The expansion of the tourism creates many advantages and also cause some critical issues including social dislocations, Negative impacts on local culture and social structure, disruptive for the ecological and biological diversity. The minimising negative impact and managing the tourism industry with moreRead MoreAustralia s An Diverse Population Spread Across Its Continent990 Words   |  4 PagesAustralia has an incredibly diverse population spread across its continent, with the census clearly showing how they attempt to exclude racial taxonomy from their statistics. In 1980 Australia adopted a more concise way of identifying ethnicity by using several distinguishing characteristics: ï‚ § a long shared history, the memory of which is kept alive ï‚ § a cultural tradition, including family and social customs, sometimes religiously based ï‚ § a common geographic origin ï‚ § a common language (but notRead MoreTranscultural Nursing : An Individual s Culture, Values Beliefs, And Practices1176 Words   |  5 Pagesdifficult due to the cultural and ethnic diversity within our society. Australia is a multicultural society. The 2011 Census revealed that almost a quarter of the population were born overseas, and 43.1 per cent of people have at least one overseas-born parent. The ever-increasing multicultural population in Australia poses a significant challenge to nurses providing individualised and holistic care to their patients. This requires nurses to recognise and appreciate cultural differences in healthcareRead MoreThe Effectiveness Of Australia s Multicultural Policy1498 Words   |  6 Pagesfacing countless trials in successfully integrating into Australian society and this has an impact on the country’s social cohesion. This essay will be supported by an interview with Cooper from Australia, Fang from China, Vo from Vietnam and Ngeno from Kenya. Introduction The 1978 implementation of Australia s multiculturalism policy was founded on the principles of social cohesion. The Australian government (2013) has been critical in supporting the assimilation of migrants and has a number of initiativesRead MoreThe Importance Of Language For Aboriginal People1286 Words   |  6 Pagespeople In 1788, when the settlers arrived in Australia, there were about 250 Indigenous languages. These distinct languages had many dialects. Today, there are about 145 languages spoken by Aboriginals, however only 18 languages remain strong in Australia. Language is a sense of identity for the Aboriginal people, is a way to communicate. Language is individual to specific tribes and unique to people and communities. Language is used to pass on cultural knowledge such as songs, bush tucker and traditionalRead MoreA Family Friend : Kelly Waipouri976 Words   |  4 PagesIn order to learn about our own ethnic identity, we must first study the people around us. These individuals shape our values, stimulate our social development and influence our perception of the world. Thus, I have decided to interview a family friend: Kelly Waipouri. Kelly was born in 1980 and raised in Dunedin, New Zealand. In 2011, Kelly migrated to Australia with her husband and three children. Kelly’s youngest child identifies as transgender. In relation to gender, family, culture and equityRead MoreGlobalization And Its Effects On Culture1087 Words   |  5 Pagesthat from 2015-2050, 91 million people are expected to migrate to high-income countries and p roduce an 82 percent increase in population in destination countries. Clearly, the prospect of steady migration and the continuing effects of globalization are expected to produce more multicultural societies. Unfortunately for many, â€Å"foreign† has become synonymous with danger (Rothkopf). The debate between cultural unity and cultural plurality dates back to the Greeks where they questioned universal human goodnessRead MoreThe Impact Of Diversity On Strategic Marketing1556 Words   |  7 PagesThe impact of diversity in strategic marketing in today’s society has increased in the American population. Before we get in depth with this let’s find out what is diversity marketing according to (diversity marketing) Customers in different cultures have different values, experiences, expectations, and ways of interacting. Even within a culture, such differences will be apparent between different subgroups not just ethnicity, but also age, gender, profession, religi on, family size, physical environment

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Artificial Minds Autonomous Robots free essay sample

Two case-studies of relatively simple autonomous robot projects followed by a discussion of embodied cognition, emergent behaviour and how these concepts apply to the above robots. This document is comprised of case studies of two autonomous robot projects, namely Frank Scotts Hexapod Robots, and MITs Robot Ant Colony. Each case study describes the behaviour each robot exhibits, and technical information on how this behaviour is executed including mechanical parts, digital circuitry and programming techniques. The case studies are followed by a discussion of embodied cognition, and how the above robots actions can be explained in terms of embodied cognition. It also discusses emergent phenomenon, both in nature and artificially intelligent robots. The Rodney series of robots refers to a group of three six-legged autonomous robots whose design is based upon Rodney Brooks subsumption architecture. Rodney 3 is the most refined and recent robot. It supersedes both Rodney 1 2 and for this reason will be the focus of this summary. We will write a custom essay sample on Artificial Minds: Autonomous Robots or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Rodney 3 is designed to operate in an environment featuring a slightly uneven surface that may be interrupted by many small obstacles and an occasional large obstacle, e.g. a pebbled track with the odd large stone or similar obstacle. The robots task is to climb over the smaller objects, and to avoid objects that are too large to climb over. To achieve the climbing action, all six legs must be able to operate independently of each other. The robot travels forward in a straight line until a large object is encountered. To avoid the object, it must reverse a few steps, shift its direction and continue its forward motion.

Sunday, April 12, 2020

The Threat of National Id free essay sample

I can plant on your key board to read every stroke. This is really ironic because Safire has typed his article and must question what infringes of his privacy have already been made that he isn’t aware of. 2. Safire says that â€Å"national ID cards give Americans a â€Å"false sense of security†. I believe Safire is referring to the security of your identity. Identification cards are supposed to prove who you are: approve purchases, entry, travel, etc. They are used so that another person can not just take your name and replace you. They ensure the safety of your identity, salary, house, and other personal things. I agree with Safire. Although I feel that there should be some sort of way to identify yourself you will only be able to do that if you give up more of your privacy, like providing a â€Å"fingerprint, description of DNA and details of your eye’s iris†. We will write a custom essay sample on The Threat of National Id or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Even with national ID cards it is difficult to ensure its accuracy due to fake ID cards. 3. People will not be able to choose not to carry a national ID card because it is a requirement. The government has made it essential for people to have this source of verification. Without this card you will not be able to â€Å"travel, or buy on credit, or participate in tomorrow’s normal life. Soon enough police as well as employers will considers those who resist full disclosure of their financial, academic, medical, religious, social, and political affiliation to be suspect. He says that Police are â€Å"unconcerned with the sanctity of an individual’s home† and developed â€Å"heat sensors to let them look inside people’s houses. 4. In paragraph 6, Safire says â€Å"But in the dreams of Big Brother and his cousin, Big Marketing, nothing can compare to forcing every person in the United States – under penalty of law – to carry what the totalitar ians used to call ‘papers’†. Safire compares the United States government to a totalitarian government if they force everyone to have â€Å"papers†. The idea of having to prove who you are goes against American ideal of living in a free country, or even being able to start over. If you force a permanent identity on someone you revoke their chance of having a brighter future. I believe that everyone has the right to seek a better future. There is a movie where they present the idea of your identity being written in your DNA. The protagonist’s was supposed to die at 31, it was written in his DNA however he wanted to become an astronaut. But because his DNA says that he will die at 31 no one is willing to hire him which forces the protagonist to go to someone who has broken both his legs and pays the man for his DNA. 5. There are advantages and dangers of national ID cards that everyone should be aware of. Having such personal national ID cards would â€Å"speed you through lines faster or buy you sure-fire protection from suicide bombers†. However the disadvantages seem to out way the advantages. With all this important information found on a single card this card has now increased in value immensely. Forcing you to protect the card as a part of yourself. The copy of that card in a national databank supposedly confidential but available to any imaginative hacker. The universal use and most likely abuse of the national card will most often trigger personal questions. This card is the ticket to losing much of your personal freedom. Purpose and Audience 1. Safire sees his readers as either friendly or neutral. You can tell because Safire informs the reader so the audience must not be hostile towards his view. However it is very plausible that he is also trying to convince his reader. Forcing you to protect the card as a part of yourself. The copy of that card in a national databank supposedly confidential but available to any imaginative hacker. The universal use and most likely abuse of the national card will most often trigger personal questions. This card is the ticket to losing much of your personal freedom. 2. Safire’s purpose does not seem to be changing his audience’s behaviour but changing their ideas or at least rethinking them. Safire mentions the dreams of Big Brother and his cousin, Big Marketing, nothing can compare to forcing every person in the United States – under penalty of law – to carry what the totalitarians used to call ‘papers’†. Safire compares the United States government to a totalitarian government if they force everyone to have â€Å"papers†. The idea of having to prove who you are goes against American ideal of living in a free country, or even being able to start over. 3. Safire assumes that his readers are well informed about national ID. He believes that they should be well informed about their rights and especially support the fourth amendment. He feels that people should protect their right to privacy and feels that having a national ID infringes on their right of privacy which he mentions many examples. I believe that everyone has the right to seek a better future. There is a movie where they present the idea of your identity being written in your DNA. The protagonist’s was supposed to die at 31, it was written in his DNA however he wanted to become an astronaut. Style and Structure 1. The writer begins his essay with discussion of losing an animal. This strategy is very effective, however I don’t understand why. By introducing the new device animal ID he makes an allusion to identification of people. Safire introduces the idea of implanting a little chip implanted under the skin in the back of the neck so that a shelter can quickly pick up the address of the owner. Safire later mentions having identification in the back of their neck alluding to the beginning of the essay which ties the whole thing together. I cannot think of a better opening. Satire mentions a lot of problems with national ID however he leaves the reader to figure out all the different ways national id could be a problem. He forces you to think about whether you are willing to give up so much information with one sweep or scan. 2. Safire’s argument is primarily appealing to deductive reasoning. Because it is proceeding from general presumption to a specific conclusion. According to the textbook, deduction holds that is all the statements in the argument are true the conclusion must also be true. Thus Safire must not use inductive reasoning to argue his case. Cops of course would insists on a record of arrests speeding tickets, E-Z pass auto movements, and links to suspicious Web sites and associates. All this information and more is being collected already which is very scary and by including all the different possiblilties it only makes having a national ID seem more of a threat. 3. The writer uses various kinds of evidence to support his points. You can tell because Safire informs the reader so the audience must not be hostile towards his view. However it is very plausible that he is also trying to convince his reader. Forcing you to protect the card as a part of yourself. The copy of that card in a national databank supposedly confidential but available to any imaginative hacker. The universal use and most likely abuse of the national card will most often trigger personal questions. However Safire does not provide a source for his evidence which forces the reader to question whether or not the is relevant. I think that Safire could’ve used more solid evidence to prove his points but it is hard to find that sort of information so its ok. 4. Safire refutes the idea of having National ID. He believes that law enforcement officials are already taking advantage of this situation. He says that Police are â€Å"unconcerned with the sanctity of an individual’s home† and developed â€Å"heat sensors to let them look inside people’s houses. And claims that the Justice department has an electronic bug that the F. B. I can plant on your key board to read every stroke. This is really ironic because Safire has typed his article and must question what infringes of his privacy have already been made that he isn’t aware of. 5. He uses rhetorical questions as a stylistic device to move his argument along. A few examples of this devise are: â€Å"Think you can encrypt your way to privacy? â€Å"How about a chip providing a complete medical history in case of emergencies? † â€Å"What about us libertarian misfits who take the trouble to try and ‘opt out’? † his entire paragraph 11 asks a bunch of rhetorical questions and the list goes on. By using rhetorical devices Safire forces his readers to think about their answe r to the question even though it doesn’t necessarily require an answer it creates an emphasis on the unknown answer that only the reader can provide. 6. Safire basically concludes his essay with a summary. The hospitals would say: how about a chip providing a complete medical history in case of emergencies? Merchants would add a chip for credit rating, banking accounts, and product preferences, while divorced spouses would lobby for a rundown of net assests and yearly expenditures. Politicians would like to know voting records and political affiliation. Cops of course would insists on a record of arrests speeding tickets, E-Z pass auto movements, and links to suspicious Web sites and associates. All this information and more is being collected already which is very scary and by including all the different possiblilties it only makes having a national ID seem more of a threat.

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

A Girl or A Boy . . . You Pick essays

A Girl or A Boy . . . You Pick essays In the July 23, 2002 issue of the Los Angeles Times Newspaper, there was an article entitled "A Girl or a Boy, You Pick" written by Aaron Zitner. The article discusses the embryo-sorting technique called pre-implantation genetic diagnosis or "PGD" and how embryo sorting makes it possible to screen for gender and diseases prior to implantation in the uterus. In the article, the author brings up some of the ethical questions PGD raises with regard to the embryos no one wants. Is it proper to discard an embryo based on its genes or gender? Which lives are not worth living? Who decides? In this paper I will argue against embryo selection for these reasons: First of all, PGD is the ultimate form of discrimination, a discrimination based on the very building blocks of a person's life; secondly if PGD technology was available and used years ago the world more than likely would have lost the great ideals and works of contributors with genetically acquired disabilities. In the last few years a genetic basis has been discovered not just for various illnesses, but for such behavioral traits as shyness, sexual promiscuity, musical ability, risk-taking and over-eating and in the future it may be possible to select for genes that contribute to higher IQ, better eyesight, etc. PGD allows parents to specify that their children will not suffer from any "defects". But by who's standard do we define "defects"? Where do we draw the line? Isn't this genetic selection process the ultimate form of discrimination? Many parents will leap at the chance to make their children smarter, healthier and prettier and the ethical concerns will be overshadowed by the promise of creating better children. I believe that almost every parent would choose to genetically engineer their child when presented the question "Do you want to tamper with nature or would you rather leave your offspring to chance?" The way I see it, utilizing PGD technology to order ...

Sunday, February 23, 2020

Persuasive Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Persuasive - Essay Example According to Alan Keith of Genentech, leadership is about creating a way for people to contribute to making something extraordinary happen. An effective leader has many qualities and characteristics which help them in running any type of an organization. This paper aims at dealing with being just as an important leadership quality. There are many definitions of justice according to different scholars and books. Justice can be defined as upholding of what is just, especially fair handling and due prize in accordance with standards, honor, or law. In other words it is the principle of moral rightness; equity. It advocates on treating situations in an organization with fairness and equality (Spillane 28-23). Injustices in any organization may be based differently. For example, there can be injustice according to race, tribe, religion, gender, family relations, or even jealousy. A good leader must be totally unbiased. They ought to not have personal bests in their team, to whom they give more power or less labor. All the members in a team should be treated equally without favoritism and discrimination. Whenever group activities are mandatory, the appearance of a leader becomes imminent. A group always works efficiently when there is a leader to guide the members and keep them aggravated on their way to success. With no a superior head, a group will not be able to do to the best of its abilities. Nevertheless, as much is it essential to have a leader, it is also important that they have the right character and the required skills. Having a bad head is even worse than having no head at all (Zaccaro 17-9). In case one wants to be a leader, one needs to cultivate certain skills and qualities in them, one of which is justice. Having a leader who is biased and does not uphold justice may lead to conflicts in the organization and it may have many hazardous effects like drop in productivity of the group and the company at large.